Archive | November 2013

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Coming Out for Marriage Equality in Japan

After hearing our marriage and coming stories, one student decided it was time for him to come out, too — but not as LGBT (he was straight) but as a Japanese person of Korean ethnicity, a group that faces significant discrimination. When he came out as Korean-Japanese and told his personal story of exclusion and discrimination, he received enormous support from his classmates. In so doing, we hope he made his own life better and, at the same time, took an important step to help the movement for human dignity and equality for all – an act with which we believe Harvey would have been very pleased.

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Policy and Legal Update – November 18-24, 2013

Policy and Legal Update – November 18-24, 2013

MEUSA closely monitors marriage equality polls, ballots, laws, and lawsuits nationwide, and keep our website updated with changes in these areas on a near-daily basis. Every Monday we update you with policy and legal updates covering the preceding week. You may always find the most up-to-date information on the Current Policy & Legal Status page on the MEUSA website. Read more…

Give the Gift of Equality – Create an Equality Registry to Benefit MEUSA

Give the Gift of Equality – Create an Equality Registry to Benefit MEUSA

In lieu of a traditional wedding registry, we created an Equality Registry, a personalized website created by MEUSA where friends and family can quickly and easily make fully tax-deductible gifts to support the important work of this organization.

For a grassroots volunteer organization like MEUSA, even a few dollars go a long way toward efforts to secure marriage equality in the more than 30 states that still prohibit loving same-sex couples from marrying.

For those of you who now have the opportunity to legally wed, please consider setting up an Equality Registry to benefit MEUSA and its critical work in your home state and across the country.

It just takes a few minutes to set up your own Equality Registry.

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Policy and Legal Update – November 11-17, 2013

Policy and Legal Update – November 11-17, 2013

MEUSA closely monitors marriage equality polls, ballots, laws, and lawsuits nationwide, and keep our website updated with changes in these areas on a near-daily basis. Every Monday we update you with policy and legal updates covering the preceding week. You may always find the most up-to-date information on the Current Policy & Legal Status page on the MEUSA website. Read more…

Traveling at the Speed of Love: Winning the Race for Equality

Five years ago last week, on Election Day 2008, California’s electorate passed Prop 8, marking perhaps the most notable low point in the marriage equality movement as a minority was stripped of a previously recognized constitutional right. As of this week five years ago, only two states – Massachusetts and Connecticut – fully recognized the marriages of same-sex couples.

How far we’ve come since then. And how fast.

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The Lay of the Land Post-Windsor and –Perry

With marriage equality now coming to Illinois and Hawaii, nearly 40% of the country lives in a marriage equality state. But just how federal and state governments will navigate the still-unsettled reality (and consequences) of marriage equality remains an open question.

Although Windsor invalidated Section 3 of DOMA, it left Section 2 in place, which allows states to refuse to recognize same gender marriages performed in other states. Marriages are not judgments or orders, and are therefore not entitled to equality under constitutional principles of full faith and credit among the states. This has the potential to impact benefits, parental rights, divorce, and other issues for same-sex couples depending on where they marry and where they live.

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Guest Post: Same Sex Marriage and International Couples

For a long time, when a US citizen married a foreign national of the opposite sex (such as a citizen of England), the foreign national could emigrate to this nation on the basis of that marriage. However, until Section 3 of the Defense of Marriage Act was struck down by the US Supreme Court, the same was not true when a US citizen married a foreign national of the same sex.

Now same sex married international couples have the same immigration rights as do heterosexual couples. A foreign national, married to a US citizen of the same sex, now has the right to emigrate to this country.

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